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Substantial nitrous oxide emissions from intertidal sediments and groundwater in anthropogenically-impacted West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts

Overview of attention for article published in Chemosphere, January 2015
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Title
Substantial nitrous oxide emissions from intertidal sediments and groundwater in anthropogenically-impacted West Falmouth Harbor, Massachusetts
Published in
Chemosphere, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.10.027
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serena Moseman-Valtierra, Kevin D. Kroeger, John Crusius, Sandra Baldwin, Adrian Green, T. Wallace Brooks, Emily Pugh

Abstract

Large N2O emissions were observed from intertidal sediments in a coastal estuary, West Falmouth Harbor, MA, USA. Average N2O emission rates from 41 chambers during summer 2008 were 10.7mol N2Om(-2)h(-1)±4.43μmol N2Om(-2)h(-1) (standard error). Emissions were highest from sediments within a known wastewater plume, where a maximum N2O emission rate was 155μmol N2Om(-2)h(-1). Intertidal N2O fluxes were positively related to porewater ammonium concentrations at 10 and 25cm depths. In groundwater from 7 shoreline wells, dissolved N2O ranged from 488% of saturation (56nM N2O) to more than 13000% of saturation (1529nM N2O) and was positively related to nitrate concentrations. Fresh and brackish porewater underlying 14 chambers was also supersaturated in N2O, ranging from 2980% to 13175% of saturation. These observations support a relationship between anthropogenic nutrient loading and N2O emissions in West Falmouth Harbor, with both groundwater sources and also local N2O production within nutrient-rich, intertidal sediments in the groundwater seepage face. N2O emissions from intertidal "hotspot" in this harbor, together with estimated surface water emissions, constituted 2.4% of the average overall rate of nitrogen export from the watershed to the estuary. This suggests that N2O emissions factors from coastal ecosystems may be underestimated. Since anthropogenic nutrient loading affects estuaries worldwide, quantification of N2O dynamics is warranted in other anthropogenically-impacted coastal ecosystems.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 28 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 30%
Student > Master 5 17%
Other 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 11 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2015.
All research outputs
#9,457,633
of 11,838,392 outputs
Outputs from Chemosphere
#3,960
of 5,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#174,854
of 257,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemosphere
#53
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,838,392 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,123 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,111 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.