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Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2016
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Title
Macromolecular crowding meets oxygen tension in human mesenchymal stem cell culture - A step closer to physiologically relevant in vitro organogenesis
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep30746
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniela Cigognini, Diana Gaspar, Pramod Kumar, Abhigyan Satyam, Senthilkumar Alagesan, Clara Sanz-Nogués, Matthew Griffin, Timothy O’Brien, Abhay Pandit, Dimitrios I. Zeugolis

Abstract

Modular tissue engineering is based on the cells' innate ability to create bottom-up supramolecular assemblies with efficiency and efficacy still unmatched by man-made devices. Although the regenerative potential of such tissue substitutes has been documented in preclinical and clinical setting, the prolonged culture time required to develop an implantable device is associated with phenotypic drift and/or cell senescence. Herein, we demonstrate that macromolecular crowding significantly enhances extracellular matrix deposition in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture at both 20% and 2% oxygen tension. Although hypoxia inducible factor - 1α was activated at 2% oxygen tension, increased extracellular matrix synthesis was not observed. The expression of surface markers and transcription factors was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. The multilineage potential was also maintained, albeit adipogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in low oxygen tension cultures, chondrogenic differentiation was significantly increased in macromolecularly crowded cultures and osteogenic differentiation was not affected as a function of oxygen tension and macromolecular crowding. Collectively, these data pave the way for the development of bottom-up tissue equivalents based on physiologically relevant developmental processes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
China 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 25%
Professor 5 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Other 7 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 36%
Unspecified 5 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 18%
Materials Science 5 18%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,817,896
of 12,292,436 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#39,318
of 55,088 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#246,209
of 344,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#4,402
of 6,631 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,292,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,088 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 6,631 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.