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Solar activity at birth predicted infant survival and women's fertility in historical Norway.

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
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Title
Solar activity at birth predicted infant survival and women's fertility in historical Norway.
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2015
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2014.2032
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gine Roll Skjærvø, Frode Fossøy, Eivin Røskaft

Abstract

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can suppress essential molecular and cellular mechanisms during early development in living organisms and variations in solar activity during early development may thus influence their health and reproduction. Although the ultimate consequences of UVR on aquatic organisms in early life are well known, similar studies on terrestrial vertebrates, including humans, have remained limited. Using data on temporal variation in sunspot numbers and individual-based demographic data (N = 8662 births) from Norway between 1676 and 1878, while controlling for maternal effects, socioeconomic status, cohort and ecology, we show that solar activity (total solar irradiance) at birth decreased the probability of survival to adulthood for both men and women. On average, the lifespans of individuals born in a solar maximum period were 5.2 years shorter than those born in a solar minimum period. In addition, fertility and lifetime reproductive success (LRS) were reduced among low-status women born in years with high solar activity. The proximate explanation for the relationship between solar activity and infant mortality may be an effect of folate degradation during pregnancy caused by UVR. Our results suggest that solar activity at birth may have consequences for human lifetime performance both within and between generations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Croatia 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Hungary 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 37%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Student > Master 5 13%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 45%
Sports and Recreations 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Unspecified 3 8%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Other 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 66. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2015.
All research outputs
#180,227
of 10,764,656 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#598
of 6,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,436
of 249,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#24
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,764,656 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,670 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,144 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.