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A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 61,722)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

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3755 Mendeley
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17 CiteULike
Title
A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance
Published in
Nature, January 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature14098
Pubmed ID
Authors

Losee L. Ling, Tanja Schneider, Aaron J. Peoples, Amy L. Spoering, Ina Engels, Brian P. Conlon, Anna Mueller, Till F. Schäberle, Dallas E. Hughes, Slava Epstein, Michael Jones, Linos Lazarides, Victoria A. Steadman, Douglas R. Cohen, Cintia R. Felix, K. Ashley Fetterman, William P. Millett, Anthony G. Nitti, Ashley M. Zullo, Chao Chen, Kim Lewis

Abstract

Antibiotic resistance is spreading faster than the introduction of new compounds into clinical practice, causing a public health crisis. Most antibiotics were produced by screening soil microorganisms, but this limited resource of cultivable bacteria was overmined by the 1960s. Synthetic approaches to produce antibiotics have been unable to replace this platform. Uncultured bacteria make up approximately 99% of all species in external environments, and are an untapped source of new antibiotics. We developed several methods to grow uncultured organisms by cultivation in situ or by using specific growth factors. Here we report a new antibiotic that we term teixobactin, discovered in a screen of uncultured bacteria. Teixobactin inhibits cell wall synthesis by binding to a highly conserved motif of lipid II (precursor of peptidoglycan) and lipid III (precursor of cell wall teichoic acid). We did not obtain any mutants of Staphylococcus aureus or Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to teixobactin. The properties of this compound suggest a path towards developing antibiotics that are likely to avoid development of resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,183 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3,755 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 84 2%
United Kingdom 42 1%
Germany 29 <1%
Denmark 12 <1%
Spain 12 <1%
France 11 <1%
India 11 <1%
Brazil 10 <1%
Switzerland 9 <1%
Other 75 2%
Unknown 3460 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 974 26%
Student > Bachelor 676 18%
Researcher 660 18%
Student > Master 559 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 195 5%
Other 691 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1648 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 515 14%
Chemistry 430 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 297 8%
Unspecified 223 6%
Other 642 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2816. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2018.
All research outputs
#225
of 12,149,178 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#48
of 61,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9
of 275,572 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#3
of 825 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,149,178 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 61,722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 73.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,572 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 825 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.