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Macroecological patterns of sexual size dimorphism in turtles of the world

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Macroecological patterns of sexual size dimorphism in turtles of the world
Published in
Journal of Evolutionary Biology, January 2018
DOI 10.1111/jeb.13223
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Agha, J. R. Ennen, A. J. Nowakowski, J. E. Lovich, S. C. Sweat, B. D. Todd

Abstract

Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a well-documented phenomenon in both plants and animals; however, the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive and maintain SSD patterns across geographic space at regional and global scales are understudied, especially for reptiles. Our goal was to examine geographic variation of turtle SSD and to explore ecological and environmental correlates using phylogenetic comparative methods. We use published body size data on 135 species from nine turtle families to examine how geographic patterns and the evolution of SSD are influenced by habitat specialization, climate (annual mean temperature and annual precipitation) and climate variability, latitude, or a combination of these predictor variables. We also found that geographic variation, magnitude, and direction of turtle SSD are best explained by habitat association, annual temperature variance, and annual precipitation. Use of semi-aquatic and terrestrial habitats was associated with male-biased SSD, whereas use of aquatic habitat was associated with female-biased SSD. Our results also suggest that greater temperature variability is associated with female-biased SSD. In contrast, wetter climates are associated with male-biased SSD compared with arid climates that are associated with female-biased SSD. We also show support for a global latitudinal trend in SSD, with females being larger than males towards the poles, especially in the families Emydidae and Geoemydidae. Estimates of phylogenetic signal for both SSD and habitat type indicate that closely related species occupy similar habitats and exhibit similar direction and magnitude of SSD. These global patterns of SSD may arise from sex-specific reproductive behavior, fecundity, and sex-specific responses to environmental factors that differ among habitats and vary systematically across latitude. Thus, this study adds to our current understanding that while SSD can vary dramatically across and within turtle species under phylogenetic constraints, it may be driven, maintained, and exaggerated by habitat type, climate, and geographic location. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 43%
Environmental Science 8 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2018.
All research outputs
#569,063
of 19,194,973 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#55
of 2,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,891
of 427,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Evolutionary Biology
#3
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,194,973 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 427,674 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.