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Nursing interventions for smoking cessation

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
3 policy sources
twitter
72 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
418 Mendeley
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Title
Nursing interventions for smoking cessation
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd001188.pub5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Virginia Hill Rice, Laura Heath, Jonathan Livingstone-Banks, Jamie Hartmann-Boyce

Abstract

Healthcare professionals, including nurses, frequently advise people to improve their health by stopping smoking. Such advice may be brief, or part of more intensive interventions. To determine the effectiveness of nursing-delivered smoking cessation interventions in adults. To establish whether nursing-delivered smoking cessation interventions are more effective than no intervention; are more effective if the intervention is more intensive; differ in effectiveness with health state and setting of the participants; are more effective if they include follow-ups; are more effective if they include aids that demonstrate the pathophysiological effect of smoking. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register and CINAHL in January 2017. Randomized trials of smoking cessation interventions delivered by nurses or health visitors with follow-up of at least six months. Two review authors extracted data independently. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months of follow-up. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence for each trial, and biochemically-validated rates if available. Where statistically and clinically appropriate, we pooled studies using a Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model and reported the outcome as a risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). Fifty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria, nine of which are new for this update. Pooling 44 studies (over 20,000 participants) comparing a nursing intervention to a control or to usual care, we found the intervention increased the likelihood of quitting (RR 1.29, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.38); however, statistical heterogeneity was moderate (I2 = 50%) and not explained by subgroup analysis. Because of this, we judged the quality of evidence to be moderate. Despite most studies being at unclear risk of bias in at least one domain, we did not downgrade the quality of evidence further, as restricting the main analysis to only those studies at low risk of bias did not significantly alter the effect estimate. Subgroup analyses found no evidence that high-intensity interventions, interventions with additional follow-up or interventions including aids that demonstrate the pathophysiological effect of smoking are more effective than lower intensity interventions, or interventions without additional follow-up or aids. There was no evidence that the effect of support differed by patient group or across healthcare settings. There is moderate quality evidence that behavioural support to motivate and sustain smoking cessation delivered by nurses can lead to a modest increase in the number of people who achieve prolonged abstinence. There is insufficient evidence to assess whether more intensive interventions, those incorporating additional follow-up, or those incorporating pathophysiological feedback are more effective than one-off support. There was no evidence that the effect of support differed by patient group or across healthcare settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 72 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 418 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Malta 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 410 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 64 15%
Student > Bachelor 58 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 12%
Researcher 42 10%
Other 22 5%
Other 84 20%
Unknown 98 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 113 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 103 25%
Psychology 22 5%
Social Sciences 20 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 2%
Other 45 11%
Unknown 108 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 56. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2020.
All research outputs
#518,439
of 19,426,268 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,117
of 11,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,055
of 428,922 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#27
of 227 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,426,268 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,930 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,922 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 227 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.