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Will-making in Irish nursing homes: Staff perspectives on testamentary capacity and undue influence

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
26 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
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Title
Will-making in Irish nursing homes: Staff perspectives on testamentary capacity and undue influence
Published in
International Journal of Law & Psychiatry, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.ijlp.2017.12.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aoibheann Houston, Mary Donnelly, Shaun T. O'Keeffe

Abstract

Allegations of lack of testamentary capacity or of undue influence are grounds for many disputed wills. Some people who make (or change an existing) will are resident in a nursing home. A substantial proportion of this population have cognitive or communication difficulties or are physically frail, and concerns regarding testamentary capacity or undue influence may be more likely to arise as a result. A questionnaire examining the experiences and views of staff regarding will-making by nursing home residents was posted to the Directors of Nursing of a random sample of 148 of the approximately 600 nursing homes in the Republic of Ireland and 81 responded. Over 10% of respondents reported seeing cases where they felt a resident who lacked capacity was visited by a solicitor or where a resident was placed under undue pressure to make or change a will or both. In most such cases, staff felt they could do little to intervene. In general, responses to the questionnaire suggested staff misunderstanding of the confidential nature of the relationship between a solicitor and a client and that respondents had an exaggerated view of the power and responsibility of doctors and of family members to influence residents' decisions and interactions with solicitors regarding will-making. This study suggests the need for improved Guidelines for staff regarding will-making in residential care including advice on how to proceed where concerns including undue pressure arise.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Researcher 4 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 11 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Psychology 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 12 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,441,995
of 19,471,971 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Law & Psychiatry
#84
of 833 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,051
of 428,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Law & Psychiatry
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,471,971 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 833 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 428,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.