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Life-stage-specific physiology defines invasion extent of a riverine fish

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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67 Mendeley
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Title
Life-stage-specific physiology defines invasion extent of a riverine fish
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, February 2015
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12332
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J. Lawrence, David A. Beauchamp, Julian D. Olden

Abstract

Many ecologists have called for mechanism-based investigations to identify the underlying controls on species distributions. Understanding these controls can be especially useful to construct robust predictions of how a species range may change in response to climate change or the extent to which a non-native species may spread in novel environments. Here we link spatially-intensive observations with mechanistic models to illustrate how physiology determines the upstream extent of the aquatic ectotherm smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) in two headwater rivers. Our results demonstrate that as temperatures become increasingly cold across a downstream to upstream gradient, food consumption in age 0 bass becomes increasingly constrained, and as a result, these fish become growth limited. Sufficient first summer growth of age 0 bass is essential for overwinter survival because young bass must persist from energy reserves accumulated during the summer, and those reserves are determined by body size. Our field data reveals the upstream extent of adult bass reproduction corresponds to a point in the downstream/upstream gradient where cold temperatures impair growth opportunities in young bass. This pattern was repeated in both study streams, and explained why bass positioned nests twice as far upstream in the warm compared to the cold stream in the same basin. Placement of spawning nests by adult bass is likely subject to strong evolutionary selection in temperate systems: if bass spawn too far upstream their young are unlikely to grow large enough to survive the winter. Consumption and growth in older bass (age 3-4) was far less sensitive to temperature. Based on these data we suggest that temperature-sensitive age 0 bass constrain the upstream distribution limits of bass within temperate streams. In this study we investigated how temperature-dependent physiology changed through the life history of a species, and in doing so, identified a climate-sensitive life history stage that likely sets the distributional limits of all other life history stages. We anticipate the framework developed here could be employed to identify how similar stage-specific environmental sensitivity determines distribution in many other ectothermic species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 66 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 22%
Student > Master 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Professor 6 9%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 25 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Engineering 3 4%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2015.
All research outputs
#1,966,109
of 12,819,049 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#616
of 1,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,695
of 290,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#14
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,049 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.