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Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, April 2015
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Title
Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, April 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.12.092
Pubmed ID
Authors

William P. Johnson, Neil Swanson, Brooks Black, Abigail Rudd, Greg Carling, Diego P. Fernandez, John Luft, Jim Van Leeuwen, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale

Abstract

We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury ((204)Hg(II)). Net production of Me(204)Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible 'reactive' Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values of kmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 30 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Researcher 6 18%
Unspecified 5 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Other 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 11 33%
Unspecified 7 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 12%
Chemistry 2 6%
Other 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2015.
All research outputs
#9,801,942
of 12,269,384 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#6,415
of 8,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#183,608
of 270,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#82
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,269,384 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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