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The Pathogenic Role of Persistent Milk Signaling in mTORC1- and Milk- MicroRNA-Driven Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Overview of attention for article published in Current Diabetes Reviews, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 239)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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68 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
reddit
3 Redditors

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
The Pathogenic Role of Persistent Milk Signaling in mTORC1- and Milk- MicroRNA-Driven Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Published in
Current Diabetes Reviews, January 2015
DOI 10.2174/1573399811666150114100653
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bodo Melnik

Abstract

Milk, the secretory product of the lactation genome, promotes growth of the newborn mammal. Milk delivers insulinotropic amino acids, thus maintains a molecular crosstalk with the pancreatic β-cell of the milk recipient. Homeostasis of β-cells and insulin production depend on the appropriate magnitude of mTORC1 signaling. mTORC1 is activated by branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), glutamine, and palmitic acid, abundant nutrient signals of cow´s milk. Furthermore, milk delivers bioactive exosomal microRNAs. After milk consumption, bovine microRNA-29b, a member of the diabetogenic microRNA-29-family, reaches the systemic circulation and the cells of the milk consumer. MicroRNA-29b downregulates branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase, a potential explanation for increased BCAA serum levels, the metabolic signature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In non-obese diabetic mice, microRNA-29b downregulates the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, which leads to early β-cell death. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, milk-driven mTORC1 signaling is physiologically restricted to the postnatal period. In contrast, chronic hyperactivated mTORC1 signaling has been associated with the development of age-related diseases of civilization including T2DM. Notably, chronic hyperactivation of mTORC1 enhances endoplasmic reticulum stress that promotes apoptosis. In fact, hyperactivated β-cell mTORC1 signaling induced early β-cell apoptosis in a mouse model. The EPIC-InterAct Study demonstrated an association between milk consumption and T2DM in France, Italy, United Kingdom, Germany, and Sweden. In contrast, fermented milk products and cheese exhibit an inverse correlation. Since the early 1950´s, refrigeration technology allowed widespread consumption of fresh pasteurized milk, which facilitates daily intake of bioactive bovine microRNAs. Persistent uptake of cow´s milk-derived microRNAs apparently transfers an overlooked epigenetic diabetogenic program that should not reach the human food chain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 79 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 21%
Researcher 17 21%
Student > Bachelor 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 5 6%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 4 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 11%
Engineering 4 5%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 52. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 November 2019.
All research outputs
#356,414
of 13,991,103 outputs
Outputs from Current Diabetes Reviews
#2
of 239 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,597
of 340,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Diabetes Reviews
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,991,103 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 239 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them