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Expectations of brilliance underlie gender distributions across academic disciplines

Overview of attention for article published in Science, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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173 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
Title
Expectations of brilliance underlie gender distributions across academic disciplines
Published in
Science, January 2015
DOI 10.1126/science.1261375
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah-Jane Leslie, Andrei Cimpian, Meredith Meyer, Edward Freeland, Leslie SJ, Cimpian A, Meyer M, Freeland E

Abstract

The gender imbalance in STEM subjects dominates current debates about women's underrepresentation in academia. However, women are well represented at the Ph.D. level in some sciences and poorly represented in some humanities (e.g., in 2011, 54% of U.S. Ph.D.'s in molecular biology were women versus only 31% in philosophy). We hypothesize that, across the academic spectrum, women are underrepresented in fields whose practitioners believe that raw, innate talent is the main requirement for success, because women are stereotyped as not possessing such talent. This hypothesis extends to African Americans' underrepresentation as well, as this group is subject to similar stereotypes. Results from a nationwide survey of academics support our hypothesis (termed the field-specific ability beliefs hypothesis) over three competing hypotheses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 636 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 63 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 19%
Unspecified 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Master 8 12%
Other 7 10%
Other 24 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 28%
Unspecified 12 18%
Social Sciences 11 16%
Physics and Astronomy 8 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Other 12 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1488. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,163
of 11,933,818 outputs
Outputs from Science
#75
of 53,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36
of 288,452 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#4
of 759 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,933,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 53,633 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,452 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 759 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.