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Stroke Prevention Rehabilitation Intervention Trial of Exercise (SPRITE) - a randomised feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, December 2017
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Title
Stroke Prevention Rehabilitation Intervention Trial of Exercise (SPRITE) - a randomised feasibility study
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12872-017-0717-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neil Heron, Frank Kee, Jonathan Mant, Philip M. Reilly, Margaret Cupples, Mark Tully, Michael Donnelly

Abstract

The value of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke is untested despite these conditions sharing similar pathology and risk factors to coronary heart disease. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of conducting a trial of an adapted home-based CR programme, 'The Healthy Brain Rehabilitation Manual', for patients following a TIA/minor stroke, participants' views on the intervention and, to identify the behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used. Clinicians were asked to identify patients attending the Ulster Hospital, Belfast within 4 weeks of a first TIA or minor stroke. Those who agreed to participate underwent assessments of physical fitness, cardiovascular risk, quality of life and mental health, before random allocation to: Group (1) standard/usual care; (2) rehabilitation manual or (3) manual plus pedometer. All participants received telephone support at 1 and 4 weeks, reassessment at 6 weeks and an invitation to a focus group exploring views regarding the study. Two trained review authors independently assessed the manual to identify the BCTs used. Twenty-eight patients were invited to participate, with 15 (10 men, 5 women; 9 TIA, 6 minor stroke; mean age 69 years) consenting and completing the study. Mean time to enrolment from the TIA/stroke was 20.5 days. Participants completed all assessment measures except VO2max testing, which all declined. The manual and telephone contact were viewed positively, as credible sources of advice. Pedometers were valued highly, particularly for goal-setting. Overall, 36 individual BCTs were used, the commonest being centred around setting goals and planning as well as social support. Recruitment and retention rates suggest that a trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel home-based CR programme, implemented within 4 weeks of a first TIA/minor stroke is feasible. The commonest BCTs used within the manual revolve around goals, planning and social support, in keeping with UK national guidelines. The findings from this feasibility work have been used to further refine the next stage of the intervention's development, a pilot study. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02712385 . This study was registered prospectively on 18/03/2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 23 21%
Student > Bachelor 21 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 17%
Student > Master 17 15%
Researcher 13 12%
Other 19 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 30 27%
Unspecified 29 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 18%
Social Sciences 6 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 22 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2018.
All research outputs
#8,083,269
of 12,889,468 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#426
of 808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,470
of 385,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#68
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,889,468 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 808 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.