↓ Skip to main content

Magnetic Anisotropy in “Scorpionate” First-Row Transition-Metal Complexes: A Theoretical Investigation

Overview of attention for article published in Chemistry - A European Journal, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Magnetic Anisotropy in “Scorpionate” First-Row Transition-Metal Complexes: A Theoretical Investigation
Published in
Chemistry - A European Journal, January 2015
DOI 10.1002/chem.201405480
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marko Perić, Amador García-Fuente, Matija Zlatar, Claude Daul, Stepan Stepanović, Pablo García-Fernández, Maja Gruden-Pavlović

Abstract

In this work we have analyzed in detail the magnetic anisotropy in a series of hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate (Tp(-) ) metal complexes, namely [VTpCl](+) , [CrTpCl](+) , [MnTpCl](+) , [FeTpCl], [CoTpCl], and [NiTpCl], and their substituted methyl and tert-butyl analogues with the goal of observing the effect of the ligand field on the magnetic properties. In the [VTpCl](+) , [CrTpCl](+) , [CoTpCl], and [NiTpCl] complexes, the magnetic anisotropy arises as a consequence of out-of-state spin-orbit coupling, and covalent changes induced by the substitution of hydrogen atoms on the pyrazolyl rings does not lead to drastic changes in the magnetic anisotropy. On the other hand, much larger magnetic anisotropies were predicted in complexes displaying a degenerate ground state, namely [MnTpCl](+) and [FeTpCl], due to in-state spin-orbit coupling. The anisotropy in these systems was shown to be very sensitive to perturbations, for example, chemical substitution and distortions due to the Jahn-Teller effect. We found that by substituting the hydrogen atoms in [MnTpCl](+) and [FeTpCl] by methyl and tert-butyl groups, certain covalent contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) could be controlled, thereby achieving higher values. Moreover, we showed that the selection of ion has important consequences for the symmetry of the ground spin-orbit term, opening the possibility of achieving zero magnetic tunneling even in non-Kramers ions. We have also shown that substitution may also contribute to a quenching of the Jahn-Teller effect, which could significantly reduce the magnetic anisotropy of the complexes studied.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 29%
Researcher 5 24%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 11 52%
Physics and Astronomy 3 14%
Computer Science 1 5%
Chemical Engineering 1 5%
Unknown 5 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2015.
All research outputs
#6,732,624
of 12,183,333 outputs
Outputs from Chemistry - A European Journal
#5,332
of 11,921 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,690
of 271,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemistry - A European Journal
#96
of 349 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,183,333 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,921 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 349 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.