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Pollination of Rapeseed (Brassica napus) by Africanized Honeybees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) on Two Sowing Dates

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#41 of 215)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Pollination of Rapeseed (Brassica napus) by Africanized Honeybees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) on Two Sowing Dates
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, December 2014
DOI 10.1590/0001-3765201420140134
Pubmed ID
Authors

EMERSON D. CHAMBÓ, NEWTON T.E. DE OLIVEIRA, REGINA C. GARCIA, JOSÉ B. DUARTE-JÚNIOR, MARIA CLAUDIA C. RUVOLO-TAKASUSUKI, VAGNER A. TOLEDO

Abstract

In this study, performed in the western part of the state of Paraná, Brazil, two self-fertile hybrid commercial rapeseed genotypes were evaluated for yield components and physiological quality using three pollination tests and spanning two sowing dates. The treatments consisted of combinations of two rapeseed genotypes (Hyola 61 and Hyola 433), three pollination tests (uncovered area, covered area without insects and covered area containing a single colony of Africanized Apis mellifera honeybees) and two sowing dates (May 25th, 2011 and June 25th, 2011). The presence of Africanized honeybees during flowering time increased the productivity of the rapeseed. Losses in the productivity of the hybrids caused by weather conditions unfavorable for rapeseed development were mitigated through cross-pollination performed by the Africanized honeybees. Weather conditions may limit the foraging activity of Africanized honeybees, causing decreased cross-pollination by potential pollinators, especially the Africanized A. mellifera honeybee. The rapeseed hybrids respond differently depending on the sowing date, and the short-cycle Hyola 433 hybrid is the most suitable hybrid for sowing under less favorable weather conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 31%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 51%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Computer Science 2 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2019.
All research outputs
#4,043,738
of 14,526,632 outputs
Outputs from Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências
#41
of 215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,435
of 281,025 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,526,632 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 215 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,025 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them