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Use of open and endovascular surgical techniques to manage vascular injuries in the trauma setting

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The, March 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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39 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Use of open and endovascular surgical techniques to manage vascular injuries in the trauma setting
Published in
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The, March 2018
DOI 10.1097/ta.0000000000001776
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edwin R. Faulconer, Bernardino C. Branco, Melissa N. Loja, Kevin Grayson, James Sampson, Timothy C. Fabian, John B. Holcomb, Thomas Scalea, David Skarupa, Kenji Inaba, Nathaniel Poulin, Todd E. Rasmussen, Joseph J. Dubose

Abstract

Vascular trauma data have been submitted to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma PROspective Observational Vascular Injury Trial (PROOVIT) database since 2013. We present data to describe current use of endovascular surgery in vascular trauma. Registry data from March 2013 to December 2016 were reviewed. All trauma patients who had an injury to a named artery, except the forearm and lower leg, were included. Arteries were grouped into anatomic regions and by compressible and non-compressible region for analysis. This review focused on patients with non-compressible transection, partial transection, or flow limiting defect injuries. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the relationships between study variables. 1143 patients from 22 institutions were included. Median age was 32 years (interquartile range IQR 23-48) and 76% (n=871) were male. Mechanisms of injury were 49% (n=561) blunt, 41% (n=464) penetrating, and 1.8% (n=21) of mixed aetiology. Gunshot wounds accounted for 73% (n=341) of all penetrating injuries. Endovascular techniques were used least often in limb trauma and most commonly in patients with blunt injuries to more than one region. Penetrating wounds to any region were preferentially treated with open surgery (74%, n=341/459). The most common indication for endovascular treatment was blunt non-compressible torso injuries (NCTI). These patients had higher injury severity scores and longer associated hospital stays, but required less packed red blood cells (PRBC), and had lower in hospital mortality than those treated with open surgery. On multivariate analysis, admission low hemoglobin concentration and abdominal injury were independent predictors of mortality. Our review of PROOVIT registry data demonstrates a high utilization of endovascular therapy among severely injured blunt trauma patients primarily with non-compressible torso hemorrhage. This is associated with decreased need for blood transfusion and improved survival despite longer length of stay. III, Therapeutic/care management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 25%
Other 1 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 13%
Lecturer 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Other 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 75%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Unspecified 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2018.
All research outputs
#696,168
of 13,754,665 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The
#257
of 3,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,334
of 393,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The
#13
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,754,665 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,277 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 393,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.