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Immunosenescence in aging: between immune cells depletion and cytokines up-regulation

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Molecular Allergy, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#7 of 149)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
269 Mendeley
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Title
Immunosenescence in aging: between immune cells depletion and cytokines up-regulation
Published in
Clinical and Molecular Allergy, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12948-017-0077-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Teresa Ventura, Marco Casciaro, Sebastiano Gangemi, Rosalba Buquicchio

Abstract

The immunosenescence is a relatively recent chapter, correlated with the linear extension of the average life began in the nineteenth century and still in progress. The most important feature of immunosenescence is the accumulation in the "immunological space" of memory and effector cells as a result of the stimulation caused by repeated clinical and subclinical infections and by continuous exposure to antigens (inhalant allergens, food, etc.). This state of chronic inflammation that characterizes senescence has a significant impact on survival and fragility. In fact, the condition of frail elderly occurs less frequently in situations characterized by poor contact with viral infections and parasitic diseases. Furthermore the immunosenescence is characterized by a particular "remodelling" of the immune system, induced by oxidative stress. Apoptosis plays a central role in old age, a period in which the ability of apoptosis can change. The remodelling of apoptosis, together with the Inflammaging and the up-regulation of the immune response with the consequent secretion of pro-inflammatory lymphokines represents the major determinant of the rate of aging and longevity, as well as of the most common diseases related with age and with tumors. Other changes occur in the innate immunity, the first line of defence providing rapid, but unspecific and incomplete protection, consisting mostly of monocytes, natural killer cells and dendritic cells, acting up to the establishment of a adaptive immune response, which is slower, but highly specific, which cellular substrate consists of T and B lymphocytes. The markers of "Inflammaging" in adaptive immunity in centenarians are characterized by a decrease in T cells "naive." The reduction of CD8 virgins may be related to the risk of morbidity and death, as well as the combination of the increase of CD8+ cells and reduction of CD4+ T cells and the reduction of CD19+ B cells. The immune function of the elderly is weakened to due to the exhaustion of T cell-virgin (CD95-), which are replaced with the clonal expansion of CD28-T cells. The increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines is associated with dementia, Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes type 2, sarcopenia and a high risk of morbidity and mortality. A correct modulation of immune responses and apoptotic phenomena can be useful to reduce age-related degenerative diseases, as well as inflammatory and neoplastic diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 269 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 269 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 43 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 14%
Researcher 36 13%
Student > Master 34 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 44 16%
Unknown 58 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 29 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 5%
Other 36 13%
Unknown 76 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2019.
All research outputs
#903,134
of 15,991,234 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#7
of 149 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,360
of 409,709 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,991,234 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 149 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,709 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.