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Hepatitis C: clinical and biological features related to different forms of cocaine use

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
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Title
Hepatitis C: clinical and biological features related to different forms of cocaine use
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, December 2017
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2016-0076
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvia Bassani Schuch-Goi, Juliana Nichterwitz Scherer, Felix Henrique Paim Kessler, Anne Orgler Sordi, Flavio Pechansky, Lisia von Diemen

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is related with several liver diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinomas, leading to more than 0.5 million deaths every year and to a great global burden. It is known that injection drug users show a high prevalence of HCV infection, being considered a risk group for this disease. Cocaine users seem to be in greater risk than other drug users, and several hypotheses for this association are being studied. To review data on HCV infection in cocaine users, taking into consideration the relevance of the different routes of drug administration and other risk behaviors. This was a narrative review performed in the main scientific databases. Data suggest that cocaine use could be associated with HCV infection due to the specificities of cocaine consumption pattern, even in those subjects who do not inject drugs, in addition to other risky behaviors, such as tattooing and unprotected sex. Injectable cocaine users seem to be more susceptible to contamination than users who do not inject drugs. However, evidence is pointing to the possibility of infection by sharing drug paraphernalia other than syringes. Moreover, specific immune system impairments caused by cocaine use are also being linked with HCV infection susceptibility, persistence and increased pathological effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 26%
Student > Bachelor 6 22%
Professor 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 8 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 6 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,571,573
of 14,158,567 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#21
of 87 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,207
of 397,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,158,567 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 87 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.