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Beyond the Edge: Linking Agricultural Landscapes, Stream Networks, and Best Management Practices

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
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Title
Beyond the Edge: Linking Agricultural Landscapes, Stream Networks, and Best Management Practices
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2018
DOI 10.2134/jeq2017.08.0319
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. M. Kreiling, M. C. Thoms, W. B. Richardson

Abstract

Despite much research and investment into understanding and managing nutrients across agricultural landscapes, nutrient runoff to freshwater ecosystems is still a major concern. We argue there is currently a disconnect between the management of watershed surfaces (agricultural landscape) and river networks (riverine landscape). These landscapes are commonly managed separately, but there is limited cohesiveness between agricultural landscape-focused research and river science, despite similar end goals. Interdisciplinary research into stream networks that drain agricultural landscapes is expanding but is fraught with problems. Conceptual frameworks are useful tools to order phenomena, reveal patterns and processes, and in interdisciplinary river science, enable the joining of multiple areas of understanding into a single conceptual-empirical structure. We present a framework for the interdisciplinary study and management of agricultural and riverine landscapes. The framework includes components of an ecosystems approach to the study of catchment-stream networks, resilience thinking, and strategic adaptive management. Application of the framework is illustrated through a study of the Fox Basin in Wisconsin, USA. To fully realize the goal of nutrient reduction in the basin, we suggest that greater emphasis is needed on where best management practices (BMPs) are used within the spatial context of the combined watershed-stream network system, including BMPs within the river channel. Targeted placement of BMPs throughout the riverine landscape would increase the overall buffering capacity of the system to nutrient runoff and thus its resilience to current and future disturbances.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 29%
Unspecified 8 26%
Student > Master 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 39%
Environmental Science 9 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Engineering 2 6%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,925,364
of 13,232,346 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#150
of 1,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,405
of 384,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#17
of 169 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,232,346 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,880 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,407 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 169 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.