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Self-sampling for human papillomavirus DNA detection: a preliminary study of compliance and feasibility in BOLIVIA

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, December 2017
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Title
Self-sampling for human papillomavirus DNA detection: a preliminary study of compliance and feasibility in BOLIVIA
Published in
BMC Women's Health, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0490-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro Surriabre, Gustavo Allende, Marcela Prado, Leyddy Cáceres, Diego Bellot, Andrea Torrico, Karina Ustariz, Shirley Rojas, Jaime Barriga, Pamela Calle, Ligia Villarroel, Rosse Mary Yañez, Marc Baay, Patricia Rodriguez, Véronique Fontaine

Abstract

Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates in Bolivia are among the highest in Latin America. This investigation aims to evaluate the possibility of using simple devices, e.g. a cotton swab and a glass slide, for self-sampling in order to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by PCR in cervico-vaginal cells. In the first phase of our study we evaluated the use of a glass slide as a transport medium for cervical cells. A physician took paired-cervical samples from 235 women. One sample was transported in Easyfix® solution and the other sample was smeared over a glass slide. Both were further analyzed and compared for human DNA recovery and HPV detection. A kappa value was determined to evaluate the agreement between the HPV DNA detection rates. In the second phase of the study, 222 women from the urban, peri-urban and rural regions of Cochabamba were requested to perform self-sampling using the following devices: a cotton swab combined with a glass slide, and a vaginal tampon. Women gave their opinion about the self-sampling technique. Finally, the agreement for high risk-HPV detection between self- and physician-collected samples was performed in 201 samples in order to evaluate the self-sampling technique. Firstly, the comparison between Easyfix® solution and the glass slide to transport clinical samples gave a good agreement for HPV DNA detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.60-0.81). Secondly, self-sampling, especially with cotton swab combined with glass slide, would generally be preferred over clinician sampling for a screening program based on HPV detection. Finally, we showed a good agreement between self- and physician collected samples for high risk-HPV detection (κ = 0.71, 95% CI 0.55-0.88). Simple devices such as a cotton swab and a glass slide can be used to perform self-sampling and HPV DNA detection. Furthermore, most Bolivian women preferred self-sampling over clinician-sampling for cervical cancer screening.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Researcher 6 9%
Lecturer 5 8%
Other 3 5%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 27 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 18%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 27 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,859,076
of 12,343,843 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#551
of 674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#248,533
of 347,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#52
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,343,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 674 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.