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A hybrid concept analysis of children of concern: Japanese healthcare professionals’ views of children at a high risk of developmental disability

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, October 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
A hybrid concept analysis of children of concern: Japanese healthcare professionals’ views of children at a high risk of developmental disability
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12887-016-0715-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ayako Ide-Okochi, Etsuko Tadaka

Abstract

The new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fifth edition, DSM-5) redefined the boundaries of autism as a spectrum. It has been reported that the number of schoolchildren with undiagnosed developmental disorders (DDs) has risen in Japan. Such children referred to as kininaru-kodomo (KK, "children of concern") by healthcare professionals fall into a gray area. Therefore, KK are often overlooked at infant medical checkups. This leaves KK without necessary medical care and special needs education. It is urgent to explore the KK concept to enable professionals to properly assess and provide for the healthcare needs of these children at a high risk of DD, ideally with early intervention. A hybrid model of concept analysis was conducted. Working definitions were obtained from a systematic literature review in the theoretical phase. Subsequent in-depth personal interviews initiated in the fieldwork phase corroborated and refined the concept. These qualitative data were integrated in the final analytical phase to yield the practice-based real definition of KK in clinical settings. Three themes emerged regarding KK children: children who require special care, children whose special healthcare needs are owing to both individual and environmental factors, and children waiting for the development of a new support system for them or their parents. This study implies that KK are children who require special support because of individual and environmental factors. The concept of KK is considered useful for keeping children with undiagnosed DDs and/or other healthcare needs connected with support networks. It is strongly recommended that a screening tool be developed that reflects the concept of children at a high risk of DD so that children in this gray area may receive necessary support even before diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 8 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Social Sciences 8 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,717,609
of 12,343,843 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#970
of 1,436 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,043
of 347,664 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#37
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,343,843 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,436 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,664 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.