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Subsurface Microbial Diversity in Deep-Granitic-Fracture Water in Colorado

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, November 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters
patent
1 patent
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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86 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Subsurface Microbial Diversity in Deep-Granitic-Fracture Water in Colorado
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, November 2007
DOI 10.1128/aem.01133-07
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. W. Sahl, R. Schmidt, E. D. Swanner, K. W. Mandernack, A. S. Templeton, T. L. Kieft, R. L. Smith, W. E. Sanford, R. L. Callaghan, J. B. Mitton, J. R. Spear

Abstract

A microbial community analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequencing was performed on borehole water and a granite rock core from Henderson Mine, a >1,000-meter-deep molybdenum mine near Empire, CO. Chemical analysis of borehole water at two separate depths (1,044 m and 1,004 m below the mine entrance) suggests that a sharp chemical gradient exists, likely from the mixing of two distinct subsurface fluids, one metal rich and one relatively dilute; this has created unique niches for microorganisms. The microbial community analyzed from filtered, oxic borehole water indicated an abundance of sequences from iron-oxidizing bacteria (Gallionella spp.) and was compared to the community from the same borehole after 2 weeks of being plugged with an expandable packer. Statistical analyses with UniFrac revealed a significant shift in community structure following the addition of the packer. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis suggested that Nitrosomonadales dominated the oxic borehole, while PLFAs indicative of anaerobic bacteria were most abundant in the samples from the plugged borehole. Microbial sequences were represented primarily by Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and a lineage of sequences which did not group with any identified bacterial division; phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of a novel candidate division. This "Henderson candidate division" dominated the clone libraries from the dilute anoxic fluids. Sequences obtained from the granitic rock core (1,740 m below the surface) were represented by the divisions Proteobacteria (primarily the family Ralstoniaceae) and Firmicutes. Sequences grouping within Ralstoniaceae were also found in the clone libraries from metal-rich fluids yet were absent in more dilute fluids. Lineage-specific comparisons, combined with phylogenetic statistical analyses, show that geochemical variance has an important effect on microbial community structure in deep, subsurface systems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Canada 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 103 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 31 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 10%
Student > Master 11 10%
Professor 10 9%
Other 24 21%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 34%
Environmental Science 24 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 18%
Unspecified 12 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 7%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#829,828
of 12,875,491 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#440
of 9,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,675
of 275,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#15
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,875,491 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,663 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,340 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.