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Hepatitis B vaccination coverage among healthcare workers at national hospital in Tanzania: how much, who and why?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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Title
Hepatitis B vaccination coverage among healthcare workers at national hospital in Tanzania: how much, who and why?
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2893-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dotto Aaron, Tumaini J. Nagu, John Rwegasha, Ewaldo Komba

Abstract

Hepatitis B vaccination for healthcare workers (HCWs) is a key component of the WHO Hepatitis B Elimination Strategy 2016-2021. Data on current hepatitis B vaccine coverage among health care workers in Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce, but these data are vital for effective programming. We assessed the proportion of HCWs vaccinated for hepatitis B and the factors associated with adequate vaccination coverage at a national hospital in Tanzania. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among consenting healthcare workers between 30th July and 30th September 2015. Vaccination histories were obtained through self-administered questionnaires. Means and proportions were used to summarize the data. Student's t and chi-squared tests were used as appropriate. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with vaccination. A total of 348 HCWs were interviewed, of whom 198 (56.9%) had received at least one dose of hepatitis B vaccination, while only 117 (33.6%) were fully vaccinated. About half of the 81 HCWs with partial vaccination (49.4%) had missed their subsequent vaccination appointments. Among unvaccinated HCWs, 14 (9.3%) had either HBV infection or antibodies against HBV infection upon pre-vaccination screening. However, the remaining participants were not vaccinated and did not know their immune status against HBV. Nearly all respondents (347, 99.3%) had heard about the hepatitis B viral vaccine. The following reasons for non-vaccination were given: 98 (65.3%) reported that they had not been offered the vaccine; 70 (46.7%) observed standard precautions to ensure infection prevention and 60 (41.3%) blamed a low level of awareness regarding the availability of the hepatitis B vaccine. The current vaccination coverage among practicing healthcare workers at Muhimbili National Hospital is low, despite a high level of awareness and the acceptance of the vaccine. Expedited and concerted efforts to scale vaccine uptake should include improved access to the vaccine, especially for newly recruited HCWs. The extension of the study to private healthcare settings and lower-level facilities would be useful.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 16 26%
Student > Master 12 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Other 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 30%
Unspecified 18 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Other 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,944,970
of 12,350,579 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,962
of 4,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#289,703
of 349,170 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#269
of 337 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 337 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.