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Use of a community-led prevention strategy to enhance behavioral changes towards Ebola virus disease prevention: a qualitative case study in Western Côte d’Ivoire

Overview of attention for article published in Global Health Research and Policy, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Use of a community-led prevention strategy to enhance behavioral changes towards Ebola virus disease prevention: a qualitative case study in Western Côte d’Ivoire
Published in
Global Health Research and Policy, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41256-017-0055-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lara Gautier, Koffi Ange Houngbedji, Jeanne Uwamaliya, Megan Coffee

Abstract

Starting in December 2013, the Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic spread in West Africa through five countries (Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria, and Mali), killing over 11,300 people. In partnership with Côte d'Ivoire's Ministry of Health, the International Rescue Committee instigated a community-led strategy aimed at promoting behavior change in order to prevent potential Ebola outbreaks in the country. The strategy was implemented in Western districts bordering Liberia, Guinea, and Mali. This study aims to analyze the community-led strategy, to document lessons learned from the experience, and to capitalize on the achievements. A case study in four districts of Western Côte d'Ivoire, i.e. Biankouma, Danané, Odienné and Touba districts was carried out. Qualitative data in 12 villages (i.e., three villages per district) was collected from 62 healthcare workers, community leaders, and ordinary community members. Data was de-identified, coded and analyzed using a thematic approach. The community-led strategy was socially accepted in the villages. Even though some community leaders reported that sensitization had been, at times, constrained by a lack of equipment, the people interviewed demonstrated accurate understanding of information about prevention practices. Some practices were easily adopted, while others remained difficult to implement (e.g., ensuring safe and dignified dead body management). This research demonstrates that sensitization efforts led by well-integrated and respected community leaders can be conducive of behavior change. Lessons learned from the community-led strategy could be applied to future disease outbreaks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Unspecified 3 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2018.
All research outputs
#7,203,850
of 12,991,339 outputs
Outputs from Global Health Research and Policy
#46
of 73 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,348
of 381,880 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Health Research and Policy
#17
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,991,339 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 73 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 381,880 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.