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Sex differences in the thermoregulation and evaporative water loss of a heterothermic bat,Lasiurus cinereus,during its spring migration

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2003
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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108 Dimensions

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221 Mendeley
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Title
Sex differences in the thermoregulation and evaporative water loss of a heterothermic bat,Lasiurus cinereus,during its spring migration
Published in
Journal of Experimental Biology, October 2003
DOI 10.1242/jeb.00574
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul M. Cryan, Blair O. Wolf

Abstract

This study quantifies sex differences in thermoregulation and water loss of a small (20-35 g) insectivorous heterothermic mammal, the hoary bat Lasiurus cinereus, during its spring migration. We measured body temperature, metabolic rate and evaporative water loss, and calculated wet thermal conductance, for bats exposed to air temperatures ranging from 0 to 40 degrees C for periods of 2-5 h. Pregnant females maintained normothermic body temperatures (35.7+/-0.7 degrees C; mean +/- S.E.M.) independent of air temperature. In contrast, males became torpid during the majority (68%) of exposures to air temperatures <25 degrees C. The thermal neutral zone (TNZ) ranged between approximately 30 degrees C and 34 degrees C in both sexes and, within the TNZ, females had lower mass-specific metabolic rates (6.1+/-0.2 mW g(-1)) than males (9.0+/-0.9 mW g(-1)). Wet thermal conductance values in torpid bats (0.7+/-0.5 mW g(-1) deg.(-1)) were lower than those of normothermic individuals (1.1+/-0.3 mW g(-1) deg.(-1)). Mass-specific rates of evaporative water loss in males were consistently higher than in females at most air temperatures and rates of water loss in torpid bats were 63+/-6% of normothermic values. These results suggest that male and pregnant female L. cinereus employ different thermoregulatory strategies during their spring migration. Females defend normothermic body temperatures, presumably to expedite embryonic growth, while males use torpor, presumably to minimize energy and water deficits. These variable thermoregulatory strategies may reflect continental differences in the summer distribution of the sexes.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 5 2%
United States 3 1%
Brazil 3 1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 201 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 19%
Researcher 35 16%
Student > Bachelor 20 9%
Student > Postgraduate 15 7%
Other 43 19%
Unknown 17 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 153 69%
Environmental Science 33 15%
Chemistry 2 <1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 <1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 <1%
Other 6 3%
Unknown 24 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2020.
All research outputs
#5,666,971
of 17,520,372 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Biology
#3,451
of 7,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,728
of 416,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Biology
#80
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,520,372 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,194 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 416,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.