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A pan-Arctic synthesis of CH4 and CO2 production from anoxic soil incubations

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
168 Mendeley
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Title
A pan-Arctic synthesis of CH4 and CO2 production from anoxic soil incubations
Published in
Global Change Biology, March 2015
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12875
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire C. Treat, Susan M. Natali, Jessica Ernakovich, Colleen M. Iversen, Massimo Lupascu, Anthony David McGuire, Richard J. Norby, Taniya Roy Chowdhury, Andreas Richter, Hana Šantrůčková, Christina Schädel, Edward A. G. Schuur, Victoria L. Sloan, Merritt R. Turetsky, Mark P. Waldrop

Abstract

Permafrost thaw can alter the soil environment through changes in soil moisture, frequently resulting in soil saturation, a shift to anaerobic decomposition, and changes in the plant community. These changes, along with thawing of previously frozen organic material, can alter the form and magnitude of greenhouse gas production from permafrost ecosystems. We synthesized existing methane (CH4 ) and carbon dioxide (CO2 ) production measurements from anaerobic incubations of boreal and tundra soils from the geographic permafrost region in order to evaluate large-scale controls of anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production and compare the relative importance of landcape-level factors (e.g., vegetation type and landscape position), soil properties (e.g., pH, depth and soil type), and soil environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative water table position). We found five-fold higher maximum CH4 production per gram soil carbon from organic soils than mineral soils. Maximum CH4 production from soils in the active layer (ground that thaws and refreezes annually) was nearly four times that of permafrost per gram soil carbon, and CH4 production per gram soil carbon was two times greater from sites without permafrost than sites with permafrost. Maximum CH4 and median anaerobic CO2 production decreased with depth, while CO2 :CH4 production increased with depth. Maximum CH4 production was highest in soils with herbaceous vegetation and soils that were either consistently or periodically inundated. This synthesis identifies the need to consider biome, landscape position, and vascular/moss vegetation types when modeling CH4 production in permafrost ecosystems and suggests the need for longer-term anaerobic incubations to fully capture CH4 dynamics. Our results demonstrate that as climate warms in arctic and boreal regions, rates of anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production will increase, not only as a result of increased temperature, but also from shifts in vegetation and increased ground saturation that will accompany permafrost thaw. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 168 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
United States 2 1%
Sweden 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 159 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 25%
Researcher 39 23%
Student > Master 25 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Student > Bachelor 10 6%
Other 28 17%
Unknown 12 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 62 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 34 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 1%
Other 12 7%
Unknown 17 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2017.
All research outputs
#791,184
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#979
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,389
of 266,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#50
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.