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The joint associations of smoking and obesity with subsequent short and long sickness absence: a five year follow-up study with register-linkage

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, December 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
The joint associations of smoking and obesity with subsequent short and long sickness absence: a five year follow-up study with register-linkage
Published in
BMC Public Health, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4997-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eira Roos, Tea Lallukka, Eero Lahelma, Ossi Rahkonen

Abstract

Both smoking and obesity are separately associated with sickness absence. Unhealthy lifestyle habits and health conditions may occur concurrently yet studies focusing on their joint association are few. This study examined the joint associations of smoking and obesity with sickness absence (SA). A mail survey among employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, during 2000-2002 included data on obesity, smoking and covariates (N = 8960, response rate 67%, 80% women). These data were prospectively linked with register data on self- (1-3 days) and medically certified (4 days or longer) SA among those consenting to the linkage (n = 6986). Pregnant, underweight and those with missing data on key variables were excluded (n = 138). The total number of participants included in the analyses was 6847. The follow-up time was 5 years. Poisson regression was used to calculate rate ratios (RR). Among women and men smoking and obesity were associated with self-certified SA. Among women there was a joint association with self-certified SA (obese smokers RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.59-2.07). Among women and men smoking and obesity were jointly associated with medically certified SA (for obese smoking women RR 2.23, 95% CI 1.93-2.57, for obese smoking men RR 2.69, 95% CI 2.03-3.55). Associations remained after adjustments for socioeconomic position, working conditions, health behaviours and self-rated health. Both smoking and obesity are jointly associated with all lengths of sickness absence. Support measures for smoking cessation and prevention of obesity could likely to reduce SA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Librarian 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,546,243
of 14,082,436 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,864
of 9,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,971
of 398,943 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#305
of 667 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,082,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,943 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 667 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.