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A New Clarification Method to Visualize Biliary Degeneration During Liver Metamorphosis in Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Visualized Experiments, June 2014
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Title
A New Clarification Method to Visualize Biliary Degeneration During Liver Metamorphosis in Sea Lamprey (<i>Petromyzon marinus</i>)
Published in
Journal of Visualized Experiments, June 2014
DOI 10.3791/51648
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Wen Chung-Davidson, Peter J. Davidson, Anne M. Scott, Erin J. Walaszczyk, Cory O. Brant, Tyler Buchinger, Nicholas S. Johnson, Weiming Li

Abstract

Biliary atresia is a rare disease of infancy, with an estimated 1 in 15,000 frequency in the southeast United States, but more common in East Asian countries, with a reported frequency of 1 in 5,000 in Taiwan. Although much is known about the management of biliary atresia, its pathogenesis is still elusive. The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanism and progression of biliary degeneration. Sea lamprey develop through three distinct life stages: larval, parasitic, and adult. During the transition from larvae to parasitic juvenile, sea lamprey undergo metamorphosis with dramatic reorganization and remodeling in external morphology and internal organs. In the liver, the entire biliary system is lost, including the gall bladder and the biliary tree. A newly-developed method called "CLARITY" was modified to clarify the entire liver and the junction with the intestine in metamorphic sea lamprey. The process of biliary degeneration was visualized and discerned during sea lamprey metamorphosis by using laser scanning confocal microscopy. This method provides a powerful tool to study biliary atresia in a unique animal model.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 30%
Researcher 3 30%
Student > Master 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 10%
Environmental Science 1 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 10%
Other 2 20%
Unknown 2 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2022.
All research outputs
#19,487,440
of 21,895,821 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#7,488
of 9,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#272,076
of 324,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#76
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,895,821 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,699 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.