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Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in patients with Mycobacterium aviumcomplex lung disease: two case reports

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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Title
Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in patients with Mycobacterium aviumcomplex lung disease: two case reports
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0684-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuma Yagi, Makoto Ishii, Ho Namkoong, Takahiro Asami, Hiroshi Fujiwara, Tomoyasu Nishimura, Fumitake Saito, Yoshifumi Kimizuka, Takanori Asakura, Shoji Suzuki, Tetsuro Kamo, Sadatomo Tasaka, Tohru Gonoi, Katsuhiko Kamei, Tomoko Betsuyaku, Naoki Hasegawa

Abstract

BackgroundPulmonary nocardiosis frequently occurs in immunocompromised hosts and in some immunocompetent hosts with chronic lung disease; however, few reports have described pulmonary nocardiosis with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung infection. Here we report for the first time two cases of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica associated with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease caused by M. avium.Case presentationCase 1 is that of a 72-year-old Japanese man with untreated MAC lung disease, who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and initiated on methotrexate. After 3 years of methotrexate therapy, the patient remained smear-negative and culture-positive for MAC, but also became smear-positive for Nocardia species. He received trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and his symptoms and lung infiltrates improved. Case 2 is that of an immunocompetent 53-year-old Japanese woman with MAC lung disease, who was treated with a combined therapy of clarithromycin, rifampicin, ethambutol, and levofloxacin. MAC sputum culture was negative after 1 year of combined treatment, which was maintained for 2 years. After four treatment-free years, Nocardia species were occasionally isolated from her sputum, although MAC was rarely isolated from sputum cultures over the same period. In both cases, the Nocardia species were identified as the recently defined N. cyriacigeorgica by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing.ConclusionWe report two cases of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. cyriacigeorgica associated with MAC lung disease caused by M. avium and suggest that N. cyriacigeorgica may be a major infective agent associated with MAC lung disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 38%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Unknown 2 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%
Unknown 3 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2015.
All research outputs
#10,995,481
of 12,373,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,927
of 4,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,492
of 265,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#16
of 17 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.