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Curcumin potentiates cholesterol-lowering effects of phytosterols in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. A randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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31 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Curcumin potentiates cholesterol-lowering effects of phytosterols in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. A randomised controlled trial
Published in
Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.metabol.2017.12.009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica J.A. Ferguson, Elizabeth Stojanovski, Lesley MacDonald-Wicks, Manohar L. Garg

Abstract

Dietary phytosterols (PS) are well-known hypocholesterolaemic agents. Curcumin elicits hypolipidaemic and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical studies, however, consistent findings in humans are lacking. Concurrent PS and curcumin supplementation may exhibit enhanced hypocholesterolaemic and anti-inflammatory effects to optimise cardio-protection. The objective of this trial was to investigate the effects of dietary intervention with PS with or without curcumin on blood lipids (primary outcome) in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. A double-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial trial was conducted in hypercholesterolaemic individuals. Participants received either placebo (PL, no phytosterols or curcumin), phytosterols (PS, 2g/d), curcumin (CC, 200mg/d) or a combination of PS and curcumin (PS-CC, 2g/d-200mg/d respectively) for four weeks. Primary outcomes included fasting total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), TC-to-HDL-C ratio (TC:HDL-C). Secondary outcomes included anthropometrics and fasting blood glucose concentrations. Seventy participants with a mean (±SEM) fasting TC concentration of 6.57±0.13mmol/L completed the study (PL, n=18; PS, n=17; CC, n=18; PS-CC, n=17). PS and PS-CC supplementation significantly lowered TC, LDL-cholesterol and TC:HDL-C post-intervention (p<0.05). Reductions from baseline in the PS group were 4.8% and 8.1% for TC and LDL-cholesterol respectively (p<0.05). CC exhibited non-significant reduction (2.3% and 2.6%) in TC and LDL-C respectively, however, the PS-CC resulted in a greater reduction in TC (11.0%) and LDL-cholesterol (14.4%) than either of the treatments alone (p<0.0001). The reduction in the PS-CC treatment was significantly greater compared to those for CC (p<0.05) or PL (p<0.01) alone. Plasma HDL-cholesterol and TG concentrations remained unchanged across all groups. No adverse side effects were reported. The addition of curcumin to phytosterol therapy provides a complementary cholesterol-lowering effect that is larger than phytosterol therapy alone. Implications of these findings include the development of a single functional food containing both the active ingredients for enhanced lipid-lowering and compliance in hypercholesterolaemic individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 31 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 25%
Unspecified 5 16%
Other 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 9%
Other 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2019.
All research outputs
#812,972
of 12,828,497 outputs
Outputs from Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental
#148
of 2,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,020
of 383,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental
#3
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,828,497 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 383,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.