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Modeling climate change, urbanization, and fire effects on Pinus palustris ecosystems of the southeastern U.S.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Management, March 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Modeling climate change, urbanization, and fire effects on Pinus palustris ecosystems of the southeastern U.S.
Published in
Journal of Environmental Management, March 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2014.12.032
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer K. Costanza, Adam J. Terando, Alexa J. McKerrow, Jaime A. Collazo

Abstract

Managing ecosystems for resilience and sustainability requires understanding how they will respond to future anthropogenic drivers such as climate change and urbanization. In fire-dependent ecosystems, predicting this response requires a focus on how these drivers will impact fire regimes. Here, we use scenarios of climate change, urbanization and management to simulate the future dynamics of the critically endangered and fire-dependent longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecosystem. We investigated how climate change and urbanization will affect the ecosystem, and whether the two conservation goals of a 135% increase in total longleaf area and a doubling of fire-maintained open-canopy habitat can be achieved in the face of these drivers. Our results show that while climatic warming had little effect on the wildfire regime, and thus on longleaf pine dynamics, urban growth led to an 8% reduction in annual wildfire area. The management scenarios we tested increase the ecosystem's total extent by up to 62% and result in expansion of open-canopy longleaf by as much as 216%, meeting one of the two conservation goals for the ecosystem. We find that both conservation goals for this ecosystem, which is climate-resilient but vulnerable to urbanization, are only attainable if a greater focus is placed on restoration of non-longleaf areas as opposed to maintaining existing longleaf stands. Our approach demonstrates the importance of accounting for multiple relevant anthropogenic threats in an ecosystem-specific context in order to facilitate more effective management actions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Mexico 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 81 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 24%
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Professor 5 6%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 28 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 29%
Engineering 8 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,020,448
of 12,211,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Management
#1,136
of 2,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,174
of 271,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Management
#41
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,211,426 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,008 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.