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Potential of selected fungal species to degrade wheat straw, the most abundant plant raw material in Europe

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, December 2017
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3 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Potential of selected fungal species to degrade wheat straw, the most abundant plant raw material in Europe
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12870-017-1196-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jasmina Ćilerdžić, Milica Galić, Jelena Vukojević, Ilija Brčeski, Mirjana Stajić

Abstract

Structural component of plant biomass, lignocellulose, is the most abundant renewable resource in nature. Lignin is the most recalcitrant natural aromatic polymer and its degradation presents great challenge. Nowadays, the special attention is given to biological delignification, the process where white-rot fungi take the crucial place owing to strong ligninolytic enzyme system. However, fungal species, even strains, differ in potential to produce high active ligninolytic enzymes and consequently to delignify plant biomass. Therefore, the goals of the study were characterization of Mn-oxidizing peroxidases and laccases of numerous mushrooms as well as determination of their potential to delignify wheat straw, the plant raw material that, according to annual yield, takes the first place in Europe and the second one in the world. During wheat straw fermentation, Lentinus edodes HAI 858 produced the most active Mn-dependent and Mn-independent peroxidases (1443.2 U L-1 and 1045.5 U L-1, respectively), while Pleurotus eryngii HAI 711 was the best laccase producer (7804.3 U L-1). Visualized bends on zymogram confirmed these activities and demonstrated that laccases were the dominant ligninolytic enzymes in the studied species. Ganoderma lucidum BEOFB 435 showed considerable ability to degrade lignin (58.5%) and especially hemicellulose (74.8%), while the cellulose remained almost intact (0.7%). Remarkable selectivity in lignocellulose degradation was also noted in Pleurotus pulmonarius HAI 573 where degraded amounts of lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose were in ratio of 50.4%:15.3%:3.8%. According to the presented results, it can be concluded that white-rot fungi, due to ligninolytic enzymes features and degradation potential, could be important participants in various biotechnological processes including biotransformation of lignocellulose residues/wastes in food, feed, paper and biofuels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 20%
Engineering 4 10%
Environmental Science 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 14 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,328,922
of 13,288,667 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#857
of 1,762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,233
of 384,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#66
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,288,667 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,762 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 384,136 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.