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Terminal Pleistocene Alaskan genome reveals first founding population of Native Americans

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
105 news outlets
blogs
24 blogs
twitter
697 tweeters
facebook
28 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
403 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Terminal Pleistocene Alaskan genome reveals first founding population of Native Americans
Published in
Nature, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/nature25173
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Víctor Moreno-Mayar, Ben A. Potter, Lasse Vinner, Matthias Steinrücken, Simon Rasmussen, Jonathan Terhorst, John A. Kamm, Anders Albrechtsen, Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, Martin Sikora, Joshua D. Reuther, Joel D. Irish, Ripan S. Malhi, Ludovic Orlando, Yun S. Song, Rasmus Nielsen, David J. Meltzer, Eske Willerslev

Abstract

Despite broad agreement that the Americas were initially populated via Beringia, the land bridge that connected far northeast Asia with northwestern North America during the Pleistocene epoch, when and how the peopling of the Americas occurred remains unresolved. Analyses of human remains from Late Pleistocene Alaska are important to resolving the timing and dispersal of these populations. The remains of two infants were recovered at Upward Sun River (USR), and have been dated to around 11.5 thousand years ago (ka). Here, by sequencing the USR1 genome to an average coverage of approximately 17 times, we show that USR1 is most closely related to Native Americans, but falls basal to all previously sequenced contemporary and ancient Native Americans. As such, USR1 represents a distinct Ancient Beringian population. Using demographic modelling, we infer that the Ancient Beringian population and ancestors of other Native Americans descended from a single founding population that initially split from East Asians around 36 ± 1.5 ka, with gene flow persisting until around 25 ± 1.1 ka. Gene flow from ancient north Eurasians into all Native Americans took place 25-20 ka, with Ancient Beringians branching off around 22-18.1 ka. Our findings support a long-term genetic structure in ancestral Native Americans, consistent with the Beringian 'standstill model'. We show that the basal northern and southern Native American branches, to which all other Native Americans belong, diverged around 17.5-14.6 ka, and that this probably occurred south of the North American ice sheets. We also show that after 11.5 ka, some of the northern Native American populations received gene flow from a Siberian population most closely related to Koryaks, but not Palaeo-Eskimos, Inuits or Kets, and that Native American gene flow into Inuits was through northern and not southern Native American groups. Our findings further suggest that the far-northern North American presence of northern Native Americans is from a back migration that replaced or absorbed the initial founding population of Ancient Beringians.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 403 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 403 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 112 28%
Researcher 60 15%
Student > Bachelor 54 13%
Student > Master 46 11%
Professor 24 6%
Other 69 17%
Unknown 38 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 129 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 88 22%
Social Sciences 39 10%
Arts and Humanities 28 7%
Environmental Science 16 4%
Other 47 12%
Unknown 56 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1468. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2020.
All research outputs
#3,094
of 15,947,892 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#446
of 75,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116
of 408,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#11
of 763 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,947,892 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75,953 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 86.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,834 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 763 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.