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Pilot study to evaluate a tailored text message intervention for pregnant smokers (MiQuit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, January 2015
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Title
Pilot study to evaluate a tailored text message intervention for pregnant smokers (MiQuit): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13063-014-0546-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sue Cooper, Katharine Foster, Felix Naughton, Jo Leonardi-Bee, Stephen Sutton, Michael Ussher, Matthew Leighton, Alan Montgomery, Steve Parrott, Tim Coleman

Abstract

BackgroundSmoking in pregnancy is a public health problem. Self-help smoking cessation support can help pregnant women to stop smoking, but the effects of delivering this kind of support via SMS text message are not known. A previous randomised controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of providing such support to pregnant smokers using an automated, tailored text message intervention called MiQuit. This larger RCT will estimate key parameters for and will test the feasibility of delivering a major trial run within the United Kingdom National Health Service settings aimed at providing definitive evidence on the utility of MiQuit for helping pregnant smokers to stop.Methods/DesignThis will be a multi-centre, parallel group RCT. Participants are being identified in 16 English antenatal care settings and must be >16 years old, pregnant, <25 weeks gestation, smoke >1 daily cigarette, have smoked >5 daily cigarettes before pregnancy, and able to understand texts in English. After consenting and submitting to the collection of baseline data, participants are randomised to control or intervention groups in a 1:1 ratio; randomisation is stratified by trial site and gestation and employs computer-generated pseudo-random code using random permuted blocks of randomly varying size, and held on a secure server. All participants receive a National Health Service (NHS) leaflet aimed at helping them to stop smoking. Intervention group women also receive the 12-week MiQuit programme of tailored, supportive, interactive text message, self-help cessation support. Women are followed up by telephone 4 weeks after randomisation and at 36 weeks gestation. The study aims to recruit 400 women, and with this sample we will be able to estimate trial centres¿ recruitment rates to within +/¿1% (margin of error¿=¿half width of 95% confidence interval); individual trial groups¿ ascertainment of rates for smoking outcomes between 4 weeks after randomisation until approximately 36 weeks gestation to within +/¿4%, and across both groups, the combined cessation rate at 36 weeks +/¿3%.DiscussionPilot trial completion will provide data to facilitate planning for a definitive trial investigating whether MiQuit works for smoking cessation in pregnancy.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT02043509 Registered 14 January 2014.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Romania 1 2%
Unknown 61 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 17%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Other 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 35%
Unspecified 12 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 16%
Social Sciences 9 14%
Psychology 4 6%
Other 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2015.
All research outputs
#9,954,404
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#2,490
of 3,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,610
of 268,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#27
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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