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“Once the delivery is done, they have finished”: a qualitative study of perspectives on postnatal care referrals by traditional birth attendants in Ebonyi state, Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
“Once the delivery is done, they have finished”: a qualitative study of perspectives on postnatal care referrals by traditional birth attendants in Ebonyi state, Nigeria
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12884-017-1616-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adanna Chukwuma, Chinyere Mbachu, Jessica Cohen, Thomas Bossert, Margaret McConnell

Abstract

While 79% of Nigerian mothers who deliver in facilities receive postnatal care within 48 h of delivery, this is only true for 16% of mothers who deliver outside facilities. Most maternal deaths can be prevented with access to timely and competent health care. Thus, the World Health Organization, International Confederation of Midwives, and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics recommend that unskilled birth attendants be involved in advocacy for skilled care use among mothers. This study explores postnatal care referral behavior by TBAs in Nigeria, including the perceived factors that may deter or promote referrals to skilled health workers. This study collected qualitative data using focus group discussions involving 28 female health workers, TBAs, and TBA delivery clients. The study conceptual framework drew on constructs in Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action onto which we mapped hypothesized determinants of postnatal care referrals described in the empirical literature. We analyzed the transcribed data thematically, and linked themes to the study conceptual framework in the discussion to explain variation in TBA referral behavior across the maternal continuum, from the antenatal to postnatal period. Differences in TBA referral before, during, and after delivery appear to reflect the TBAs understanding of the added value of skilled care for the client and the TBA, as well as the TBA's perception of the implications of referral for her credibility as a maternal care provider among her clients. We also found that there are opportunities to engage TBAs in routine postnatal care referrals to facilities in Nigeria by using incentives and promoting a cordial relationship between TBAs and skilled health workers. Thus, despite the potential negative consequences TBAs may face with postnatal care referrals, there are opportunities to promote these referrals using incentives and promoting a cordial relationship between TBAs and skilled health workers. Further research is needed on the interactions between postnatal maternal complications, TBA referral behavior, and maternal perception of TBA competence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 79 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 32%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 12 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 20%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Engineering 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,312,855
of 15,071,208 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#650
of 2,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,473
of 402,977 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#94
of 323 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,071,208 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,786 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 402,977 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 323 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.