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Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
99 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
283 Mendeley
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Title
Ecology and conservation biology of avian malaria
Published in
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, February 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2011.06431.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

LaPointe, Dennis A., Atkinson, Carter T., Samuel, Michael D., Lapointe DA, Atkinson CT, Samuel MD

Abstract

Avian malaria is a worldwide mosquito-borne disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. These parasites occur in many avian species but primarily affect passerine birds that have not evolved with the parasite. Host pathogenicity, fitness, and population impacts are poorly understood. In contrast to continental species, introduced avian malaria poses a substantial threat to naive birds on Hawaii, the Galapagos, and other archipelagoes. In Hawaii, transmission is maintained by susceptible native birds, competence and abundance of mosquitoes, and a disease reservoir of chronically infected native birds. Although vector habitat and avian communities determine the geographic distribution of disease, climate drives transmission patterns ranging from continuous high infection in warm lowland forests, seasonal infection in midelevation forests, and disease-free refugia in cool high-elevation forests. Global warming is expected to increase the occurrence, distribution, and intensity of avian malaria across this elevational gradient and threaten high-elevation refugia, which is the key to survival of many susceptible Hawaiian birds. Increased temperatures may have already increased global avian malaria prevalence and contributed to an emergence of disease in New Zealand.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 283 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Lithuania 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 264 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 63 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 16%
Researcher 44 16%
Student > Bachelor 41 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 7%
Other 71 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 181 64%
Environmental Science 31 11%
Unspecified 26 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 4%
Other 21 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2017.
All research outputs
#822,969
of 8,912,948 outputs
Outputs from Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
#419
of 5,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,614
of 246,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
#14
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,912,948 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.