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Association between time perspective and organic food consumption in a large sample of adults

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 video uploader

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Association between time perspective and organic food consumption in a large sample of adults
Published in
Nutrition Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12937-017-0311-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc Bénard, Julia Baudry, Caroline Méjean, Denis Lairon, Kelly Virecoulon Giudici, Fabrice Etilé, Gérard Reach, Serge Hercberg, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Sandrine Péneau

Abstract

Organic food intake has risen in many countries during the past decades. Even though motivations associated with such choice have been studied, psychological traits preceding these motivations have rarely been explored. Consideration of future consequences (CFC) represents the extent to which individuals consider future versus immediate consequences of their current behaviors. Consequently, a future oriented personality may be an important characteristic of organic food consumers. The objective was to analyze the association between CFC and organic food consumption in a large sample of the adult general population. In 2014, a sample of 27,634 participants from the NutriNet-Santé cohort study completed the CFC questionnaire and an Organic-Food Frequency questionnaire. For each food group (17 groups), non-organic food consumers were compared to organic food consumers across quartiles of the CFC using multiple logistic regressions. Moreover, adjusted means of proportions of organic food intakes out of total food intakes were compared between quartiles of the CFC. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and dietary characteristics. Participants with higher CFC were more likely to consume organic food (OR quartile 4 (Q4) vs. Q1 = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.62, 2.20). Overall, future oriented participants were more likely to consume 14 food groups. The strongest associations were observed for starchy refined foods (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.63, 1.94), and fruits and vegetables (OR = 1.74, 95% CI: 1.58, 1.92). The contribution of organic food intake out of total food intake was 33% higher in the Q4 compared to Q1. More precisely, the contribution of organic food consumed was higher in the Q4 for 16 food groups. The highest relative differences between Q4 and Q1 were observed for starchy refined foods (22%) and non-alcoholic beverages (21%). Seafood was the only food group without a significant difference. This study provides information on the personality of organic food consumers in a large sample of adult participants. Consideration of future consequences could represent a significant psychological determinant of organic food consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Other 8 30%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Other 9 33%
Unknown 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2020.
All research outputs
#8,473,566
of 16,127,240 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#816
of 1,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,205
of 409,590 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#47
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,127,240 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.7. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 409,590 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.