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Repeated influenza vaccination for preventing severe and fatal influenza infection in older adults: a multicentre case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in CMAJ, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 5,022)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
35 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
160 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Repeated influenza vaccination for preventing severe and fatal influenza infection in older adults: a multicentre case–control study
Published in
CMAJ, January 2018
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.170910
Pubmed ID
Authors

Itziar Casado, Ángela Domínguez, Diana Toledo, Judith Chamorro, Jenaro Astray, Mikel Egurrola, María Amelia Fernández-Sierra, Vicente Martín, María Morales-Suárez-Varela, Pere Godoy, Jesús Castilla

Abstract

The effectiveness of repeated vaccination for influenza to prevent severe cases remains unclear. We evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on preventing admissions to hospital for influenza and reducing disease severity. We conducted a case-control study in 20 hospitals in Spain during the 2013/14 and 2014/15 influenza seasons. Community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older who were admitted to hospital for laboratory-confirmed influenza were matched with inpatient controls by sex, age, hospital and admission date. The effectiveness of vaccination in the current and 3 previous seasons in preventing influenza was estimated for inpatients with nonsevere influenza and for those with severe influenza who were admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) or who died. We enrolled 130 inpatients with severe and 598 with nonsevere influenza who were matched to 333 and 1493 controls, respectively. Compared with patients who were unvaccinated in the current and 3 previous seasons, adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccination in the current and any previous season was 31% (95% confidence interval [CI] 13%-46%) in preventing admission to hospital for nonsevere influenza, 74% (95% CI 42%-88%) in preventing admissions to ICU and 70% (95% CI 34%-87%) in preventing death. Vaccination in the current season only had no significant effect on cases of severe influenza. Among inpatients with influenza, vaccination in the current and any previous season reduced the risk of severe outcomes (adjusted odds ratio 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.76). Among older adults, repeated vaccination for influenza was twice as effective in preventing severe influenza compared with nonsevere influenza in patients who were admitted to hospital, which is attributable to the combination of the number of admissions to hospital for influenza that were prevented and reduced disease severity. These results reinforce recommendations for annual vaccination for influenza in older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 160 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 33%
Professor 3 17%
Researcher 3 17%
Librarian 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 56%
Unspecified 4 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 418. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2018.
All research outputs
#14,904
of 9,075,724 outputs
Outputs from CMAJ
#25
of 5,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#778
of 224,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CMAJ
#3
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,075,724 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.