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Transition from Low to High Iodide and Iodine Concentration States in the Briggs–Rauscher Reaction: Evidence on Crazy Clock Behavior

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physical Chemistry A, January 2018
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Title
Transition from Low to High Iodide and Iodine Concentration States in the Briggs–Rauscher Reaction: Evidence on Crazy Clock Behavior
Published in
Journal of Physical Chemistry A, January 2018
DOI 10.1021/acs.jpca.7b11774
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maja C. Pagnacco, Jelena P. Maksimović, Nebojša I. Potkonjak, Bojan Đ. Božić, Attila K. Horváth

Abstract

The Briggs-Rauscher reaction containing malonic acid may undergo a sudden transition from low (state I) to high iodide and iodine (state II) concentration states after a well-defined and strongly reproducible oscillatory period. This study clearly shows that even though the time-dependent behavior of the oscillatory state is reproducible, the time lag necessary for the appearance of the state I to state II transition after the system leaves the oscillatory state becomes irreproducible for an individual kinetic run. This crazy clock behavior of the state I→state II transition is identified by repeated experiments, in which stirring rate is taken as a control parameter and all other parameters such as initial conditions, temperature, vessel surface and the age of solution were kept constant. Surprisingly, a better stirring condition does not make the transition to be reproducible; it simply does not allow the transition to happen at all. The proposed mechanism, additional explanations as well as proposals for this irreproducibility of state I to state II transition have been presented. Considering the fact that the number of crazy-clock reactions is only a few, this study may contribute to a better understanding of fundaments of this phenomenon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Librarian 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Researcher 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 4 27%
Chemical Engineering 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,969,091
of 12,354,606 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physical Chemistry A
#3,123
of 5,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#297,748
of 357,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physical Chemistry A
#153
of 280 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,489 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 280 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.