↓ Skip to main content

Stabilization of RDT target antigens present in dried Plasmodium falciparum-infected samples for validating malaria rapid diagnostic tests at the point of care

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Stabilization of RDT target antigens present in dried Plasmodium falciparum-infected samples for validating malaria rapid diagnostic tests at the point of care
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2155-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Collins Morang’a, Cyrus Ayieko, George Awinda, Rachel Achilla, Caroline Moseti, Bernhards Ogutu, John Waitumbi, Elizabeth Wanja

Abstract

Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are a great achievement in implementation of parasite based diagnosis as recommended by World Health Organization. A major drawback of RDTs is lack of positive controls to validate different batches/lots at the point of care. Dried Plasmodium falciparum-infected samples with the RDT target antigens have been suggested as possible positive control but their utility in resource limited settings is hampered by rapid loss of activity over time. This study evaluated the effectiveness of chemical additives to improve long term storage stability of RDT target antigens (HRP2, pLDH and aldolase) in dried P. falciparum-infected samples using parasitized whole blood and culture samples. Samples were treated with ten selected chemical additives mainly sucrose, trehalose, LDH stabilizer and their combinations. After baseline activity was established, the samples were air dried in bio-safety cabinet and stored at room temperatures (~ 25 °C). Testing of the stabilized samples using SD Bioline, BinaxNOW, CareStart, and First Response was done at intervals for 53 weeks. Stability of HRP2 at ambient temperature was reported at 21-24 weeks while that of PAN antigens (pLDH and aldolase) was 2-18 weeks of storage at all parasite densities. The ten chemical additives increased the percentage stability of HRP2 and PAN antigens. Sucrose alone and its combinations with Alsever's solution or biostab significantly increased stability of HRP2 by 56% at 2000 p/µL (p < 0.001). Trehalose and its combinations with biostab, sucrose or glycerol significantly increased stability of HRP2 by 57% (p < 0.001). Unlike sucrose, the stability of the HRP2 was significantly retained by trehalose at lower concentrations (500, and 200 p/µL). Trehalose in combination biostab stabilizer increased the percentage stability of PAN antigens by 42, and 32% at 2000 and 500 p/µL respectively (p < 0.01). This was also the chemical combination with the shortest reconstitution time (~ < 20 min). These findings confirm that stabilizing RDT target antigens in dried P. falciparum-infected samples using chemical additives provides field-stable positive controls for malaria RDTs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 50%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Computer Science 1 10%
Other 2 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2018.
All research outputs
#7,121,844
of 14,064,191 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,028
of 4,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,774
of 397,950 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#283
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,064,191 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,057 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,950 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.