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A decade of research on the 17q12-21 asthma locus: Piecing together the puzzle

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, September 2018
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Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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22 Dimensions

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45 Mendeley
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Title
A decade of research on the 17q12-21 asthma locus: Piecing together the puzzle
Published in
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2017.12.974
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle M. Stein, Emma E. Thompson, Nathan Schoettler, Britney A. Helling, Kevin M. Magnaye, Catherine Stanhope, Catherine Igartua, Andréanne Morin, Charles Washington, Dan Nicolae, Klaus Bønnelykke, Carole Ober

Abstract

Chromosome 17q12-21 remains the most highly replicated and significant asthma locus. Genotypes in the core region defined by the first GWAS correlate with expression of two genes, ORMDL3 and GSDMB, making these prime candidate asthma genes, although recent studies have implicated GSDMA distal to and PGAP3 proximal to the core region as independent loci. We review here 10 years of studies on the 17q12-21 locus and suggest that genotype-specific risks for asthma at the proximal and distal loci are not specific to early onset asthma and mediated by PGAP3, ORMDL3, and/or GSDMA expression. We propose that the weak and inconsistent associations of 17q SNPs with asthma in African Americans is due to the high frequency of some 17q alleles, the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium on African-derived chromosomes, and possibly different early life asthma endotypes in these children. Finally, the inconsistent association between asthma and gene expression levels in blood or lung cells from older children and adults suggests that genotype effects may mediate asthma risk or protection during critical developmental windows and/or in response to relevant exposures in early life. Thus, studies of young children and ethnically diverse populations are required to fully understand the relationship between genotype and asthma phenotype and the gene regulatory architecture at this locus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 27%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Master 6 13%
Unspecified 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 9%
Other 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 22%
Unspecified 8 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Other 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,681,810
of 13,514,418 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
#3,577
of 7,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,405
of 385,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
#117
of 203 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,514,418 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 385,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 203 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.