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Artificial light at night confounds broad-scale habitat use by migrating birds

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
130 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
91 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
220 Mendeley
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Title
Artificial light at night confounds broad-scale habitat use by migrating birds
Published in
Ecology Letters, January 2018
DOI 10.1111/ele.12902
Pubmed ID
Authors

James D. McLaren, Jeffrey J. Buler, Tim Schreckengost, Jaclyn A. Smolinsky, Matthew Boone, E. Emiel van Loon, Deanna K. Dawson, Eric L. Walters

Abstract

With many of the world's migratory bird populations in alarming decline, broad-scale assessments of responses to migratory hazards may prove crucial to successful conservation efforts. Most birds migrate at night through increasingly light-polluted skies. Bright light sources can attract airborne migrants and lead to collisions with structures, but might also influence selection of migratory stopover habitat and thereby acquisition of food resources. We demonstrate, using multi-year weather radar measurements of nocturnal migrants across the northeastern U.S., that autumnal migrant stopover density increased at regional scales with proximity to the brightest areas, but decreased within a few kilometers of brightly-lit sources. This finding implies broad-scale attraction to artificial light while airborne, impeding selection for extensive forest habitat. Given that high-quality stopover habitat is critical to successful migration, and hindrances during migration can decrease fitness, artificial lights present a potentially heightened conservation concern for migratory bird populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 130 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 220 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 220 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 45 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 15%
Student > Bachelor 29 13%
Student > Master 28 13%
Other 13 6%
Other 33 15%
Unknown 38 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 102 46%
Environmental Science 49 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 1%
Chemistry 2 <1%
Other 14 6%
Unknown 46 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 173. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2022.
All research outputs
#171,743
of 21,399,109 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#60
of 2,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,379
of 442,783 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#4
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,399,109 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,784 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 442,783 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.