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The Zinc Sensing Receptor, a Link Between Zinc and Cell Signaling

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Medicine, July 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
The Zinc Sensing Receptor, a Link Between Zinc and Cell Signaling
Published in
Molecular Medicine, July 2007
DOI 10.2119/2006-00038.hershfinkel
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michal Hershfinkel, William F. Silverman, Israel Sekler

Abstract

Zinc is essential for cell growth. For many years it has been used to treat various epithelial disorders, ranging from wound healing to diarrhea and ulcerative colon disease. The physiological/molecular mechanisms linking zinc and cell growth, however, are not well understood. In recent years, Zn2+ has emerged as an important signaling molecule, activating intracellular pathways and regulating cell fate. We have functionally identified an extracellular zinc sensing receptor, called zinc sensing receptor (ZnR), that is specifically activated by extracellular Zn2+ at physiological concentrations. The putative ZnR is pharmacologically coupled to a Gq-protein which triggers release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores via the Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) pathway. This, in turn results in downstream signaling via the MAP and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase) pathways that are linked to cell proliferation. In some cell types, e.g., colonocytes, ZnR activity also upregulates Na+/H+ exchange, mediated by Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1), which is involved in cellular ion homeostasis in addition to cell proliferation. Our overall hypothesis, as discussed below, is that a ZnR, found in organs where dynamic zinc homeostasis is observed, enables extracellular Zn2+ to trigger intracellular signaling pathways regulating key cell functions. These include cell proliferation and survival, vectorial ion transport and hormone secretion. Finally, we suggest that ZnR activity found in colonocytes is well positioned to attenuate erosion of the epithelial lining of the colon, thereby preventing or ameliorating diarrhea, but, by signaling through the same pathways, a ZnR may enhance tumor progression in neoplastic disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Israel 1 3%
China 1 3%
Unknown 36 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Researcher 8 21%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 13%
Chemistry 4 10%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,569,785
of 12,352,780 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Medicine
#126
of 577 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,429
of 266,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Medicine
#5
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,780 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 577 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.