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Beneficial changes in rumen bacterial community profile in sheep and dairy calves as a result of feeding the probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H57

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Applied Microbiology, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
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Title
Beneficial changes in rumen bacterial community profile in sheep and dairy calves as a result of feeding the probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H57
Published in
Journal of Applied Microbiology, February 2018
DOI 10.1111/jam.13688
Pubmed ID
Authors

B.J. Schofield, N. Lachner, O.T. Le, D.M. McNeill, P. Dart, D. Ouwerkerk, P. Hugenholtz, A.V. Klieve

Abstract

The probiotic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H57 increased weight gain, increased nitrogen retention and increased feed intake in ruminants when administered to the diet. This study aims to develop a better understanding of this probiotic effect by analysing changes in the rumen prokaryotic community. Sequencing the 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicons of the rumen microbiome, revealed that ewes fed H57 had a significantly different rumen microbial community structure to Control sheep. By contrast, dairy calves showed no significant differences in rumen community structure between treatment groups. In both instances, H57 was below detection in the rumen community profile and only present at low relative abundance as determined by qPCR. The altered rumen microbial community in sheep likely contributes to increased weight gain through more efficient digestion of plant material. As no change occurred in the rumen community of dairy calves it is suggested that increased weight gain may be due to changes in community function rather than structure. The low relative abundance of H57 as determined by qPCR, suggests that weight gain was not directly mediated by the probiotic, but rather by influencing animal behaviour (feed consumption) and/or altering the native rumen community structure or function. This study provides a novel look at the rumen prokaryotic community in both sheep and dairy calves when fed H57. These findings improve our understanding for the potential rumen community involvement in H57-enabled weight gain. The study reveals that the probiotic B. amyloliquefaciens H57 is capable of benefiting ruminants without colonising the rumen, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 80%
Researcher 4 40%
Student > Postgraduate 2 20%
Student > Master 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Other 5 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 90%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 60%
Chemistry 2 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Other 4 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,814,161
of 12,352,780 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Applied Microbiology
#415
of 2,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,161
of 355,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Applied Microbiology
#15
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,780 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,670 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.