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Effects of an experimental heat wave on fatty acid composition in two Mediterranean seagrass species

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Pollution Bulletin, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of an experimental heat wave on fatty acid composition in two Mediterranean seagrass species
Published in
Marine Pollution Bulletin, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.12.057
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pedro Beca-Carretero, Freddy Guihéneuf, Lázaro Marín-Guirao, Jaime Bernardeau-Esteller, Rocío García-Muñoz, Dagmar B. Stengel, Juan M. Ruiz

Abstract

Global warming is emerging as one of the most critical threats to terrestrial and marine species worldwide. This study assessed the effects of simulated warming events in culture on two seagrass species, Posidonia oceanica and Cymodocea nodosa, which play a key role in coastal ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea. Changes in fatty acids as key metabolic indicators were assessed in specimens from two geographical populations of each species adapted to different in situ temperature regimes. Total fatty acid (TFA) content and composition were compared in C. nodosa and P. oceanica from natural populations and following exposure to heat stress in culture. After heat exposure, individuals of C. nodosa and P. oceanica adapted to colder temperatures in situ accumulated significantly more TFA than controls. For both species, the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) decreased, and the percentage of saturated fatty acids (SFA) increased significantly after the heat treatment. These results highlight that populations of both species living at warmest temperatures in situ were more thermo-tolerant and exhibited a greater capacity to cope with heat stress by readjusting their lipid composition faster. Finally, exposure of seagrasses to warmer conditions may induce a decrease in PUFA/SFA ratio which could negatively affect their nutritional value and generate important consequences in the healthy state of next trophic levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 25%
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Other 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 41%
Environmental Science 10 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 7%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,711,755
of 14,368,945 outputs
Outputs from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#984
of 5,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,328
of 398,665 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#39
of 160 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,368,945 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,237 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,665 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 160 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.