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Gamma-delta (γδ) T cells: friend or foe in cancer development?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
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1 patent
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
248 Mendeley
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Title
Gamma-delta (γδ) T cells: friend or foe in cancer development?
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1378-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yijing Zhao, Chao Niu, Jiuwei Cui

Abstract

γδ T cells are a distinct subgroup of T cells containing T cell receptors (TCRs) γ and TCR δ chains with diverse structural and functional heterogeneity. As a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, γδ T cells participate in various immune responses during cancer progression. Because of their direct/indirect antitumor cytotoxicity and strong cytokine production ability, the use of γδ T cells in cancer immunotherapy has received a lot of attention over the past decade. Despite the promising potential of γδ T cells, the efficacy of γδ T cell immunotherapy is limited, with an average response ratio of only 21%. In addition, research over the past 2 years has shown that γδ T cells could also promote cancer progression by inhibiting antitumor responses, and enhancing cancer angiogenesis. As a result, γδ T cells have a dual effect and can therefore be considered as being both "friends" and "foes" of cancer. In order to solve the sub-optimal efficiency problem of γδ T cell immunotherapy, we review recent observations regarding the antitumor and protumor activities of major structural and functional subsets of human γδ T cells, describing how these subsets are activated and polarized, and how these events relate to subsequent effects in cancer immunity. A mixture of both antitumor or protumor γδ T cells used in adoptive immunotherapy, coupled with the fact that γδ T cells can be polarized from antitumor cells to protumor cells appear to be the likely reasons for the mild efficacy seen with γδ T cells. The future holds the promise of depleting the specific protumor γδ T cell subgroup before therapy, choosing multi-immunocyte adoptive therapy, modifying the cytokine balance in the cancer microenvironment, and using a combination of γδ T cells adoptive immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 248 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 248 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 20%
Researcher 43 17%
Student > Bachelor 36 15%
Student > Master 35 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 7%
Other 28 11%
Unknown 39 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 62 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 51 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 4%
Other 20 8%
Unknown 41 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2020.
All research outputs
#2,505,527
of 15,441,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#369
of 2,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,074
of 406,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#29
of 262 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,441,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 406,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 262 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.