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International migration patterns of Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) from four breeding populations in Alaska

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, January 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
International migration patterns of Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) from four breeding populations in Alaska
Published in
PLOS ONE, January 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0189954
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah E. McCloskey, Brian D. Uher-Koch, Joel A. Schmutz, Thomas F. Fondell

Abstract

Identifying post-breeding migration and wintering distributions of migratory birds is important for understanding factors that may drive population dynamics. Red-throated Loons (Gavia stellata) are widely distributed across Alaska and currently have varying population trends, including some populations with recent periods of decline. To investigate population differentiation and the location of migration pathways and wintering areas, which may inform population trend patterns, we used satellite transmitters (n = 32) to describe migration patterns of four geographically separate breeding populations of Red-throated Loons in Alaska. On average (± SD) Red-throated Loons underwent long (6,288 ± 1,825 km) fall and spring migrations predominantly along coastlines. The most northern population (Arctic Coastal Plain) migrated westward to East Asia and traveled approximately 2,000 km farther to wintering sites than the three more southerly populations (Seward Peninsula, Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, and Copper River Delta) which migrated south along the Pacific coast of North America. These migration paths are consistent with the hypothesis that Red-throated Loons from the Arctic Coastal Plain are exposed to contaminants in East Asia. The three more southerly breeding populations demonstrated a chain migration pattern in which the more northerly breeding populations generally wintered in more northerly latitudes. Collectively, the migration paths observed in this study demonstrate that some geographically distinct breeding populations overlap in wintering distribution while others use highly different wintering areas. Red-throated Loon population trends in Alaska may therefore be driven by a wide range of effects throughout the annual cycle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 42%
Environmental Science 9 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,762,743
of 12,362,966 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#35,676
of 135,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,206
of 355,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,177
of 4,844 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,362,966 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 135,564 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,844 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.