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Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate improves thrombin generation and prothrombin time in patients with bleeding complications related to rivaroxaban: a single-center pilot trial

Overview of attention for article published in Thrombosis Journal, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 158)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate improves thrombin generation and prothrombin time in patients with bleeding complications related to rivaroxaban: a single-center pilot trial
Published in
Thrombosis Journal, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12959-017-0158-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bettina Schenk, Stephanie Goerke, Ronny Beer, Raimund Helbok, Dietmar Fries, Mirjam Bachler

Abstract

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) pose a great challenge for physicians in life-threatening bleeding events. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of reversing the DOAC rivaroxaban using four-factor PCC (prothrombin complex concentrate), a non-specific reversing agent. Patients with life-threatening bleeding events during rivaroxaban treatment were included and administered 25 U kg-1 of PCC. Blood samples were collected immediately prior to as well as after PCC treatment at predefined time intervals. The primary endpoint was defined as the difference in thrombin generation (TG) parameters ETP (endogenous thrombin potential) and Cmax (peak thrombin generation) prior to and ten minutes subsequent to PCC treatment. Thirteen patients, of whom the majority suffered from intra-cranial haemorrhage (ICH) or subdural haemorrhage (SDH), were included and administered PCC. The results show that the ETP (TG) significantly (p = 0.001) improved by 68% and Cmax (TG) by 54% (p = 0.001) during PCC treatment. In addition, the Quick value (prothrombin time: QuickPT) significantly improved by 28% and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was decreased by 7% ten minutes after PCC administration. Cmax was reduced at baseline, but not ETP, aPTT or QuickPT. Lag time until initiation (TG, tlag), thromboelastometry clotting time (CTEXTEM) and time to peak (TG, tmax) correlated best with measured rivaroxaban levels and were out of normal ranges at baseline, but did not improve after PCC administration. In 77% of the patients bleeding (ICH/SDH-progression) ceased following PCC administration. During the study three participants passed away due to other complications not related to PCC treatment. The possibility of thrombosis formation was also evaluated seven days after administering PCC and no thromboses were found. This study shows that use of PCC improved ETP, Cmax, QuickPT and aPTT. However, of these parameters, only Cmax was reduced at the defined baseline. It can be concluded that CTEXTEM, tlag and tmax correlated best with the measured rivaroxaban levels. The study drug was found to be safe. Nonetheless, additional studies specifically targeting assessment of clinical endpoints should be performed to further confirm these findings. EudraCT trial No. 2013-004484-31.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Other 4 20%
Researcher 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 45%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 10%
Unspecified 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,077,805
of 12,362,966 outputs
Outputs from Thrombosis Journal
#46
of 158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,817
of 355,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Thrombosis Journal
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,362,966 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 158 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.