↓ Skip to main content

Activation of frontal neocortical areas by vocal production in marmosets

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, January 2010
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Activation of frontal neocortical areas by vocal production in marmosets
Published in
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, January 2010
DOI 10.3389/fnint.2010.00123
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristiano S. Simões

Abstract

Primates often rely on vocal communication to mediate social interactions. Although much is known about the acoustic structure of primate vocalizations and the social context in which they are usually uttered, our knowledge about the neocortical control of audio-vocal interactions in primates is still incipient, being mostly derived from lesion studies in squirrel monkeys and macaques. To map the neocortical areas related to vocal control in a New World primate species, the common marmoset, we employed a method previously used with success in other vertebrate species: Analysis of the expression of the immediate early gene Egr-1 in freely behaving animals. The neocortical distribution of Egr-1 immunoreactive cells in three marmosets that were exposed to the playback of conspecific vocalizations and vocalized spontaneously (H/V group) was compared to data from three other marmosets that also heard the playback but did not vocalize (H/n group). The anterior cingulate cortex, the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex presented a higher number of Egr-1 immunoreactive cells in the H/V group than in H/n animals. Our results provide direct evidence that the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the region that comprises Broca's area in humans and has been associated with auditory processing of species-specific vocalizations and orofacial control in macaques, is engaged during vocal output in marmosets. Altogether, our results support the notion that the network of neocortical areas related to vocal communication in marmosets is quite similar to that of Old world primates. The vocal production role played by these areas and their importance for the evolution of speech in primates are discussed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 4%
United States 2 2%
Norway 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
China 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 72 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 23%
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Professor 4 5%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 43%
Neuroscience 20 24%
Psychology 8 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 5%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 10 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 November 2012.
All research outputs
#3,649,501
of 12,552,119 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
#199
of 529 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,541
of 274,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
#10
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,552,119 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 529 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,342 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.