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Molecular epidemiological investigations of plague in Eastern Province of Zambia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, January 2018
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Title
Molecular epidemiological investigations of plague in Eastern Province of Zambia
Published in
BMC Microbiology, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12866-017-1146-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stanley S. Nyirenda, Bernard M. Hang′ombe, Edgar Simulundu, Evans Mulenga, Ladslav Moonga, Robert S. Machang′u, Gerald Misinzo, Bukheti S. Kilonzo

Abstract

Plague is a flea-borne zoonotic and invasive disease caused by a gram negative coccobacillus bacterium called Yersinia pestis. Plague has caused three devastating pandemics globally namely: the Justinian, Black Death and Oriental plague. The disease in the Eastern Province of Zambia has been reported in Nyimba and Sinda Districts in the past 15 years. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of plague in the two affected districts. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), targeting Plasminogen activator gene (pla gene) of Y. pestis, was performed on suspected human bubo aspirates (n = 7), rodents (n = 216), shrews (n = 27) and fleas (n = 1494). Of these, one positive sample from each source or host was subjected to sequencing followed by phylogenetic analysis. The plasminogen activator gene (pla gene) of Y. pestis was detected in 42.8% bubo aspirates, 6.9% rodents, 3.7% shrew and 0.8% fleas. The fleas were from pigs (n = 4), goats (n = 5) and rodents (n = 3). The sequencing and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the pla gene of Y. pestis in Nyimba and Sinda was similar and the isolates demonstrated a high degree of evolutionary relationship with Antiqua strains from the Republic of Congo and Kenya. It can be concluded that pla gene of Y. pestis was present in various hosts in the two districts and the strains circulating in each district were similar and resembles those in the Republic of Congo and Kenya.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 4 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2018.
All research outputs
#12,569,719
of 15,825,604 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#1,648
of 2,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#294,708
of 407,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#125
of 195 outputs
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