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The first survey of airborne trace elements at airport using moss bag technique

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, May 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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20 Mendeley
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Title
The first survey of airborne trace elements at airport using moss bag technique
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9140-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gordana Vuković, Mira Aničić Urošević, Sandra Škrivanj, Konstantin Vergel, Milica Tomašević, Aleksandar Popović

Abstract

Air traffic represents an important way of social mobility in the world, and many ongoing discussions are related to the impacts that air transportation has on local air quality. In this study, moss Sphagnum girgensohnii was used for the first time in the assessment of trace element content at the international airport. The moss bags were exposed during the summer of 2013 at four sampling sites at the airport 'Nikola Tesla' (Belgrade, Serbia): runway (two), auxiliary runway and parking lot. According to the relative accumulation factor (RAF) and the limit of quantification of the moss bag technique (LOQT), the most abundant elements in the samples were Zn, Na, Cr, V, Cu and Fe. A comparison between the element concentrations at the airport and the corresponding values in different land use classes (urban central, suburban, industrial and green zones) across the city of Belgrade did not point out that the air traffic and associated activities significantly contribute to the trace element air pollution. This study emphasised an easy operational and robust (bio)monitoring, using moss bags as a suitable method for assessment of air quality within various microenvironments with restriction in positioning referent instrumental devices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Researcher 3 15%
Professor 2 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 7 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 15%
Chemistry 3 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2018.
All research outputs
#9,894,995
of 12,358,022 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,662
of 3,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#255,525
of 354,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#87
of 186 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,358,022 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,301 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 354,938 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 186 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.